Childhood trauma and stress lead to fibromyalgia-Dr. David Brady

In the past, traumatic experiences and stress factors in childhood have been neglected as predisposing factors for the development of various chronic pain disorders and psychiatric disorders, including fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, insomnia, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and chronic fatigue. However, the turnaround is reversing as research shows a significant link between childhood trauma and adult health.

The central nervous system develops rapidly in childhood and responds to various stimuli and stress factors that occur in life. When a number of environmental stimuli are encountered, new pathways are created between the brain cells in response to each stimulus. For example, a pleasurable experience, such as a parent’s embrace or a sweet meal, creates ways for the brain to respond to these stimuli in a pleasurable manner. Likewise, a frightening experience will create and exercise ways that react in fear. This process of creating new pathways in response to stimuli is called neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticity decreases with age, making it harder to develop new pathways and to tune our brain’s responses to stimuli. Children are an advantage because they have a high neuroplasticity. However,

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In the presence of a strong and normal support system, short-term stressors and a child’s stress response are properly activated and buffered by supportive relationships. In this way, the positive pathways in the brain and the formation of the nervous system develop to respond appropriately to the stressors of normal life. When the brain encounters different stressors, a good resistance is built up, so that more and more stress conditions can be experienced with normal biological reactions.

In the absence of supportive relationships or in the presence of extreme and / or long-term stressors, the stress response is inappropriately activated and may adversely affect the development of the brain and neurological system. By activating brain regions responsible for anxiety, anxiety, and impulsive responses, neuronal pathways are developed to promote these areas of the brain. As a result, areas of the brain responsible for reasoning, planning and control of behavior, have may not be suitable tracks, resulting in a tendency to negative emotions such as fear, anxiety, panic attacks and depression.

The response to human stress causes a cascade of events that affect the brain, the neurological system, and various endocrine glands and hormones. This explains his great impact on health. The stress response begins with neurons that experience environmental stressors or stimuli, transform the stimuli into messages, and send these messages along the pathways of various brain regions for interpretation and response. During these activities, the production of brain chemicals, called neurotransmitters, is triggered. Neuromediators deliver messages to other areas of the brain and other organs. These chemicals communicate with the adrenal glands (the endocrine system), which then produce hormones such as cortisol and epinephrine (adrenaline). These hormones are responsible for the traditional “fight and flight” response to traumatic or dangerous stressors. These are helpful if we have to avoid a bullet or a car accident. However, the chronic activation of these hormones can affect the health of the immune system, colon, energy systems and the perception of pain, which leads to various health problems such as irritability bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia. When the stress response is activated in childhood, it becomes hypervigilant and has difficulty maintaining the balance in adulthood. chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia. When the stress response is activated in childhood, it becomes hypervigilant and has difficulty maintain the balance in adulthood. chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia. When the stress response is activated in childhood,

According to the child’s national post-traumatic stress network, the most common traumatic stressors that affect children include accidents, physical trauma, abuse, neglect and exposure to family and community violence. Other persistent stressors include the death of a family member, divorce, drug or alcohol abuse, and natural disasters. These traumatic stressors require the neurological system and the stress response system in childhood to produce exaggerated responses to normal stimuli. Fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome are two examples of hypervigilant neurological reactions. Normal stimuli such as wind in the face or rubbing of clothing against the skin can cause painful sensations in people with fibromyalgia, which is an exaggerated reaction to pain. Normal stressors that cause the neurological system to inappropriately stimulate the bowel muscles, leading to alternating constipation and convulsive diarrhea, is a classic sign of irritable bowel syndrome. The pain reaction is also increased in people with irritable bowel syndrome, causing abdominal pain. Normal stressors that cause the neurological system to inappropriately stimulate the bowel muscles, leading to alternating constipation and convulsive diarrhea, is a classic sign of irritable bowel syndrome. The pain reaction is also increased in people with irritable bowel syndrome, causing abdominal pain. Normal stressors that cause the neurological system to inappropriately stimulate the intestinal muscles,

At present, the specific causes of conditions associated with chronic pain and fatigue, such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, are unknown; However, in nearly two decades of research, it has been emphasized that stressors in early childhood are important risk factors for initiating these conditions. Although not all children exposed to traumatic stressors suffer from emotional and physical health disorders, research shows that children experiencing traumatic events or long-term stressors are 2.7 times more likely to suffer from functional somatic conditions (debilitating functional conditions, where there is no difference cause), such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, chronic pain, Irritable bowel syndrome and others. Additionally, these conditions are common in psychiatric conditions such as anxiety and depression. The age at which trauma or stress is known, its duration and even the nature of the trauma does not seem to alter these alarming statistics.

In view of the increasing prevalence of functional somatic diseases as well as emotional and psychiatric problems, it is important to consider the impact of childhood experiences on the development of these conditions. Children who welcome the trauma of the past are not always helpful in promoting health and healing, and can even be counterproductive. However, understanding one’s own health impact is helpful in properly identifying elusive health conditions such as fibromyalgia. It is also important to understand how to protect future generations from the debilitating effects of childhood trauma and stressors. Finally, it serves as a good example of the success of a functional medicine approach.

 

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